Skip to main content

About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CNNW 17
CNN 12
CSPAN 11
MSNBCW 11
MSNBC 10
CSPAN2 6
KPIX (CBS) 4
CNBC 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 93
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)
tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians were not educated in the matter office -- matters of the heart and the hearth. but by studying the first ladies -- the first think thomas jefferson did after spending 1 days cooped up in a loft outside of philadelphia, writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he was pregnant and had had a miscarriage, and he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every within -- every interof -- every winter of the revolutionary war, there was martha washington. i propose washington's closer advisor was alexander hamilton, and one chapter talks about hamilton's history of womanizing, bill clinton was not the first and was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior and high office. there's a long history. itot spitzer, arnold schwarzenegger, david petraeus, had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read letters written by martha washington during those winter
that. we need to first get to be fair. if someone's got a dollar and he's educated and he should be in the slot or should be voted for, he should be able to. forget about the billions that people have getting themselves into office. i think it's terrible. host: all right, robert. we're going to leave it there. we're going to take a break from our discussion regarding term limits for elected officials and talk about a decision that was handed down by the federal court of appeals yesterday. to talk to us about that, we're going to bring in josh hicks of the "the washington post," the federal blogger. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. host: the lead in this morning's "the washington post," your paper, says boil boil officials -- says obama officials ruled in power, courts cut power of appointment, judges limit action during senate recesses. the president exceeded his constitutional authority by making appointments when the senate was on a break last year, a federal appeals court ruled friday the court's broad ruling would sharply limited power that pr
of the schoolkill center and peggy executive director of west harlem environmental education. so nice to have all of you at the table. folks who follow the story know the second part of the story is that the president is deposed by a military coup last year in 2012. the thing i love and hate about that story is yep, that's exactly the problem. we can't make big, sustainable international green policy because we are fighting, literally fighting over islands sinking into the ocean. here, too, we are continuing to fight over all these policy questions and politics questions and missing the big story, the big story that is affecting all of us. is there any way to get us refocused on international inner generational, sustainable and international? >> climate change. we all have skin and neck in it. polls show 49% of americans believe that climate change is occurring and that people have caused it. 24% say it's climate change, but not from people. i'm not sure what science people are waiting for at this point. there's so much more science in and more coming in all the time. none theless, it was great t
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
health care, not talking about education, but you are showing the two guns, because you're trying to solidify to those voters who vote based upon guns, that to me is crazy. and so if you're going to get criticized, you're going to praise guns, you're going to get criticized. so, look, i understand that -- >> but just because someone says that guns are okay does not mean that they are advocating mass shootings like in newtown. >> look -- >> that's aggressive. that's bullying and far worse, some might say. >> last i checked, politics is a rough and tumble business. and i have seen far worse when it comes to commercials. but, again, the point you're making is, when you have a commercial and you want to tout guns on one hand, expect the opposite reaction on the other. >> rohan, i have to say, if that ad is okay, maybe using -- i mean, the other ads that the nra ran that were offensive about the president's children, all these ads seem to be problematic. >> i find that ad really infuriating for this reason. we have some deep, deep problems that drive crime and violence in this society.
sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cyber and everybody's eyes glaze over. i can see it. nonetheless, the call is here. we need to deal with this urgently and imminently because attacks are coming all the time from different sources and take different forms. they are increasing in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- tha
's program. so whether it's bridging and roads or medical research or education or a number of other things fall under the discretionary category including definite spending. i simply say, we have to come to the realization that unless we can address our mandatory spending, which is running away with the budget and ever shrinking's congress' ability about how we use discretionary spending. unless we can get control of that, everybody is going fall short of what they want. i'm not debating as more money should go to medical research or building infrastructure or whatever. i'm simply saying all is being squeezed and i'm asking you to support your senator or senators or representatives in giving them the backbone and the courage to stand up we have to address this or everybody loses. and i think that is the message of the day. and now we had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until h
liberal education system as well as a very liberal media in general. my expectation with kids coming out of high school or college this sort of seem to think the government just passed the money and gives it out. if they don't seem to realize until much later in life that they're taking my money and giving it out. so i think it's an educational problem, much deeper than whether a candidate is running in a particular town. thanks for c-span. host: peter, thanks for the call. guest: conservatives have a lot of work to do in the media and in education. the media situation is a lot more balanced than 20 years ago or 30 years ago. a couple of major newspapers and magazines have collapsed. young people can access a ton of points of view and a lot of data and information and that is a healthy thing. people complain about the internet and all of these blogs and what happened to the good old days when you had serious editors manning the phones? i think the current situation is much healthier for a vigorous democracy and there's a lot of good stuff out there. if we have a piece on our website, a w
made a big historic speech. were you pleased with the message on education, which i know you care about? >> i'm really excited about the next four years. there's a lot we can do in terms of encouraging kids and changing inner cities forever, really. by encouraging these kids to be entrepreneurs and scientists. that's where i'm putting all of my focus on. >> what else do you think his priorities should be in the next four years? if you have to choose a few, he can't go through everything he wants to do. >> jobs in america, you know, around consumer electronics. next year, consumer electronics will make $200 billion, and i would like to see those $200 billion, you know, a lot of that money here in america. >> do you think so many jobs from big companies are being outsourced at the moment? apples and company like that, they spend too much abroad? >> i think they spend pretty much everything abroad when it comes to manufacturing. we have to educate our kids and educate america. you know, so they have no excuse. the excuse is, the skillset isn't here in america. so if we get these american c
's about education, about research and development, it's about controlling our energy future. all of these are part of the equation. and we can't just do one piece of it, and we can't let that piece prevent us or become a smoke screen for not acting on the others. so that is the challenge. how do you put that puzzle together, move forward in a balanced way, so we're funding those kinds of priorities that we need to grow? >> it's interesting, doris, as you look at the historical sweep as well. here is a very toxic atmosphere in washington. a carryover of, you know, difficult debates. and the president who's popular, has a unified party, but also seems reluctant to go out on a limb on some big areas where he thinks he's not going to get much cooperation from republicans. >> i'm not sure that's true. i think gun control. he came out with sweeping proposals. i mean, that's certainly out on a limb. you're not going to get a lot of support perhaps from republicans. but his idea, i think, is that if you educate the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote.
. manufacturers have barbershops that supply them and local cafeter cafeterias. to educate communities around the world that this is vital for job growth because we have a jobs crisis today, ali, and manufacturing is the solution space for the jobs crisis. >> so, andrew liveris talking about job creation. the theme of dynamism has emerged over the course of the week here to jobs. >> i came here thinking they were absolutely stark-raving mad with resilient dynamism. now i'm starring to think it was a stroke of genius because it's allowed everybody to grab onto something and that developed into the theme jobs. >> well, listen, a few long working days here at davos. we've interviewed a lot of people, attended a lot of sessions. some of the best work is done just in the hallway having conversations with people. but this is a beautiful place and a pretty fun place to be. there are a lot of [ indiscernible ]s and parties and of course the skiing. richard, before we got started, hit the slopes. but being the true journalist that he is, you asked people how they were feeling about the economy. what d
how we can better use those resources not only to support public endeavors like education and public safety and roads, but also of money that could be pumped into the private sector. >> david, if you have another question or comment, we are almost at the end of our time. but we can squeeze one -- ok. i think we have not at all exhausted this topic. we may have exhausted our panelists and some of you. we will return to its. this has been -- at least for a poor country lawyer, a very enlightening discussion of the economic issues. we've not done too much with the politics. i suppose there might be a smidgen of that in some of the decisions that get made over the next month's. let me take this occasion to thank you for a plethora of wonderful questions and for hanging in there in a very difficult topic. think our friends at the commonwealth fund for not only provided us -- thank our friends at the commonwealth fund for not only providing us this topic, but great direction in shaping this program. i would like you to think -- join me in thanking our panel for a terrific discussion. [appl
education, we're with them. the thing that care rid them is the people's positive attitude about education. >> it's interesting, you have a democratic governor that is standing between you and the legislature, you're halfway happy about it. >> thank you. >> we'll be right back ♪ chances are, you're not made of money, so don't overpay for motorcycle insurance. geico, see how much you could save. support for gun control. >>> welcome back. dozens of people walked along the waterfront this weekend to show support for gun control. the event was organized by the group one million moms for gun control. the largest of which was held in washington d.c., that's where members of the newtown, connecticut community joined in with thousands of others d emanding action. >> if it can happen in newtown, it can happen in any town in any city in any state until they make these federal laws. >> the gun control battle is leading to huge crowds autobahn shows around at -- gun shows. they say it will take away their right to bear arms. congress will hold a hearing on g
by a single mother. had no education. and really, no hope. and what i always say, i was lucky that i was put in front of an icon of empowerment. >> he is. every time i interview him, i feel empowered. >> that's true. what he is is an incredible educator. by the grace of the universe i was able to fall in the lap of this educator. he helped get me out of that place where i was, where there was no home. >> he was homeless at the time. what i love about mike's story, is mike just didn't help himself, he started a small business to start with. one of the young women who worked for him was addicted to meth. how did you end up in your new business? >> the young woman had come to work for me a number of years ago. you could tell something was wrong. she was addicted to methamphetamine. she was completely off drugs in a few days. it ournd out her father, her dad was incredibly successful in the metal recycling business. i got a call from him shortly thereafter who said anybody who has influence over human beings like this needs to help. he taught me the business. seven months later he allowed me to
to do work on jobs. we need to do work on global warming, on education, on deficit, but to do that now in the senate, majority doesn't rule. it requires 60 votes. nothing in the constitution about having to have 60 votes to pass a piece of legislation. the republicans have demanded hundreds of filibusters, brought forth hundreds of filibusters in recent years. i'm kind of old-fashioned. i think they should have all the time it needs to get up on the floor and state their case. i suspect minority rights. but the american people are hurting. they want action. we can't -- we cannot address the major issues if we continue to need 60 votes and the legislation yesterday did not deal with that issue. >> senator bernie sanders, always good to have you on the program. thank you. >> thank you. >> ryan, he wasn't alone in voting no. a lot of people have concern about this filibuster bill, that it's so watered down, it doesn't go far enough. i mean it may help with some things like the kinds of delays in appointments that the president has complained about to things like judges. is it a step in th
reviving education for grade school and for university. he talked about climate change. now, he's talked about a$é+m) @% these things before. so none of this comes as a surprise. but he also talked about the need to organize. that citizens involved, and it's not a coincidence that he's making those points to and othe just a couple of days after he has transformed his political presidential campaign into an organizing outfit now called organizing for action, that jim messina and others will be in charge of. so i think he is aiming for those far away fences for things you would like to see him do, chris, but it's going to happen. not just if he wants to do it, but if he can mobilize enough political support to try to get over some of that republican obstructionism. >> joan, the same question. did you see the beef today? terms of substantive accomplishments worthy of a second term? >> i did, chris. it was a soaring speech. it was an inspiring speech. but it was also as david said practical nuts and bolts, talking about the highway system, talking about we don't want people standing in line
or her choices. when it comes to education, something i care deeply about, let the democrats extol the virtues of are hopelessly antiquated one-size-fits-all factor schools where the child follows the dollars. meanwhile, let us republicans the to the success of child- centered education solutions that meet the needs of the digital age. [applause] these are but a few examples of the way we must fight the battle of ideas. it must be how we win the argument. one thing we've got to get straight right now -- washington has spent a generation trying to bribe our citizens and export of our states. as republicans, it is time to quit arguing around the edges of this current system. that brings me to my third point -- i want to shift gears and speak to changes i think we must make if we need to win elections. i'm not one of those who believes we need to abandon or change our principles. this observation badly disappoints many of our friends like liberals in the national media. real change means supporting abortion on demand for the national media. for them, real change means abandoning tradi
in profile the way to get the education she can't afford. >> he is look i can help you get through school easy. you just travel with me, have fun, be around me, and just keep me company. and i said, sure. you are going to pay for my school. >> reporter: we observed being a sugar baby comes with other perks. last june he told us he drops $5,000 a month on monti. >> these earrings with a pair of high heel shoes, great outfit. oh, goodness. whoa, god. $387. >> fine. >> reporter: it is not just monti. he has six other sugar babies. >> this is what we call the lost and found drawer. what some of my lovely sugar babies left behind. >> reporter: an it executive who retired to spend enough of $150,000 a year on lady combined. >> when you walk in a room and have a boughtful lady with you it is a compliment to you. as a male. pulling up in a really nice car or something. hate to compare it that way. but it is. it has the a good feel to it. >> reporter: monti is look a really nice car? >> yeah. >> reporter: like a car the relationships may not last forever though they start out promising. >> he taug
because of my experiences being educated in the west and looking at how western systems did it it was the rule of law. i was surprised by western think tanks and the european ambassadors in our country where they say that is very difficult. you think? i mean, this has been a major challenge and you can't have this by waving a magic wand. it will take hard work so that people start to, for the next elections, vote for candidates because they're on left to right of these particular issues. so, that political party culture, that is the major challenge. and where we're starting from low down in jordan, we're still steps ahead of many countries in the middle east. so, it's going to be tough for all of us. but that's the only way that i think we can do it. >> your majesty, thank you very much. this was a fascinating conversation. >> thank you. >>> that was jordan's king abdullah ii. >>> when we come back, new attacks in algeria have made many talk about the return of al qaeda. but the facts don't quite support the hyperbole. support the hyperbole. i'll explain. [ watch ticking ] [
to action. 26 beautiful people, 20 wonderful babies and courageous teachers and educators would be alive today. >> are you where we thought we would be in this country with regards to the public debate that is going on right now since newtown, connecticut? >> the public debate on gun violence prevention has always been fraught with controversy. and i am encouraged by many of my colleagues who have been staunch opponents of any measures in the past who say we really need to do something about the guns. and that is the -- >> did you think that by now -- 20 first graders killed, six teachers killed and there was this tremendous mood in this country. a lot of people talked about wanting to do something. and now it seems as if once again the devil's in the details and the political will has subsided. one point to make very clearly is there rights to possess firearms. the second amendment has been reaffirmed to provide for a right to possess firearms. on marketing and promotion, gun ownership and responsible shooting and hunting ought to be encouraged and promoted. and nothing i say about prom
it is dollars. meanwhile let us republicans feature the successed of child sentered education solutions, education solutions where the dollars follow the child. [applause] these are but a few examples of the way we must fight the battle or how we must win the argument. one thing we've got to get straight right now washington has spent a generation trying to bribe our citizens and extort our states. as republicans it's time to quit arguing around the edges of this corrupt system. that brings me to my third point which i want to shift gears and speak to changes i believe we must make if we are to win elections. as i ipped kated before i do not believe we need to abandon or change our principles. i know this observation disappoints many of our friends in the national media of course. for those in the national media that means supporting abortion on demand without policy. that means abandoning traditional marriage. for them real change means agreing to higher taxes every year to pay for government expanse and real change means engorsing the lightened policies of european social lism. that i
educational, health outcome, it actually impacts every aspect of your life. we find that students do much better in school on tests when their brains are positive. we find that you're much more successful at work when your brain is positive as well. did you know happiness significantly improves your brain heath, improving your memory and your ability to do different tasks? it increases your energy by up to 31%-- that's phenomenal! it decreases your heart disease by 30%. this could be a life or death decision for you. a 23% drop in fatigue related symptoms like headaches and backaches, which would be wonderful. it decreases our chances of depression by up to 31%. we find you're more successful at losing weight that exercise is more enjoyable. you make better financial decisions, so all those things you were wanting to do, happiness actually makes you better at doing those. and the list goes on and on. now how does that sound? it sounds fantastic, right? the question is, how do we do that? how do we create that type of happiness in our lives with all the chal
of this over a period of years. and her goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. it's very much in its time that we can teach people certain skills. >> the dark side of the personal finances industry saturday night at 10:00 on afterwards on c-span2. and look for more book tv online. like us on facebook. >> but i think it's all an evolutionary process. you grow into this role. and my sense is that you never get comfortable if you are always pushing for change and growth, not just in yourself but in the issues that you care about. you're never done. so there is never a point in time where you feel like i am now here and i can do this the same way all the time. it's always changing. it's changes given the state of the country and you don't know what those are going to be from one day to the next. so you have to be flexible and open to involve. >> the first ladies their public and private lives. >> c-span is teaming up for a series for television, first ladies influence and image airing over two seasons. season one begins president's day at 9:00 eastern
at the university of michigan. what it is is a response to, you know, a lot of new education options that are out there online and many of them are free, but, you go and take a course in history at one place, another one on writing and spanish at other places, what do you do with all the classes, especially since a lot of the other universities online they don't offer degrees. under this wisconsin university flexible option program, what students can do is earn a degree by passing a series of tests without ever stepping foot on the campus. now, you may need to take a few classes to get up to speed, but it offers students a ton of flexibility, it could really be a sign of where education is headed. you know, testing your way to a bachelor's degree. >> a lot of people go in their freshman year and say it makes sense. if i could take the test without going to the class. has the university determined how much this program will cost? >> reporter: not yet. but we're going to get more details when this thing goes online in the fall. >> okay. so i want to talk about something serious now. we should proba
and pay higher wages and improving education and job training so that more people can get the skills that businesses are looking for. it means reforming our immigration system and keeping our children safe from the menace of gun violence. and it means bringing down our deficit in a balanced way by making necessary reforms and asking every american to pay their fair share. >> meanwhile, republicans stressing their agenda today as well. cutting spending. >> our nation's total debt is now larger than our entire economy. this means that every man, woman and child owes a $53,000 share of this debt. that level of spending is unsustainable. a major credit rating agency has already downgraded our nation's credit once. and if we don't start making some real progress on spending reforms, more downgrades are likely in the near future. >> about eight minutes past the hour now. live look this is happening in washington, d.c. as we speak. this is happening really across the country. one of the main ones, this is a rally for gun control taking place in washington, d.c. people there are rallying for
. ♪ >>> this morning we come together to hear about the president's plans to strengthen education. >> today's flashback takes us back to 1998 at an event that started out pretty much like any other white house news conference, but it turned out to be anything but normal. when president clinton made a statement about his new education initiative and then on his own launched into one of the most infamous presidential lines ever uttered. >> i have to go back to work on my state of the union speech and i worked on it pretty late last night, but i want to say one thing to the american people. i want you to listen to me. i'm going to say this again. i did not have sexual relations with that woman, miss lewinsky. i never told anybody to lie, nota single time, ever. these allegations are false, and i need to go back to work for the american people. thank you. >> you almost forgot the conviction with which he said it. the next night clinton went to capitol hill to deliver that state of the union address with no mention whatsoever of the sex scandal that was consuming his presidency. it would take until december
is a fearless leader, answering the call to serve throughout his career. work on issues from education and transporation to civil rights and national service advanced the causes of the party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] now let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. marina alana, with your support today, serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive treasurer of the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service as president of the tier local 11 # reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. she'll strengthen the bond between the dnc and brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friends, congresswoman of hawaii, with your support today, will also serve as vice chair. she's the first american indue member of congress, and along with the congresswoman of illinois, one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [a
like the red states, these reaganomics and blue states are practicing obamaomicc taxes and education going to create jobs. great thing about america we will see. we will have the experiment of which these states will prosper. i'm going to put my money on the south. >> in massachusetts also exploding healthcare costs. >> that's right. >> paul: all right, when we comeca back, hillary clinton's swan song as she prepares to leave washington a look at her final performance and her future in politics. red lobster's 30 shrimp. wow, that's a lot of shrimp. [ male announcer ] it's red lobster's 30 shrimp! for $11.99 pair any two shrimp selections on one plate! like mango jalapeÑo shrimp and parmesan crunch shrimp. just $11.99. offer ends soon! i'm ryon stewart, and i sea food diffently. but, dad, you've got... [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands? >> the fact is we had four dead americans. was it because of a protest or because of guys out for a
of our colleges and universities. >> reporter: his call to give more education money to poor schools possibly at the expense of richer suburban districts. >> i'm being asked to vote against the interests of my school district for the betterment of the state. that's a tough question for legislators to deal with. >> reporter: but whatever the fight, brown seems determined for as the little engine said as it pushed the big train up the mountain. >> i think i can, i think i can. i think i can. and over the mountain the little engine went.
the signs when a woman comes in who has had a history of violence, but in educating women of empowering them. >> pelley: jon, thanks very much. catholic schools all over the country have been closing because of financial problems. the new york archdiocese said yesterday it is closing 22 elementary schools, including this one: blessed sacrament in the bronx, whose alumni include supreme court justice sonia sotomayor. cbs news' "60 minutes" was there when she urged students to shoot for the moon in their careers. from the heavens to the deep blue sea, we learned today that scientists have captured for the very first time images of the mysterious giant squid. have a look at this. marine biologists found it in its natural habitat off the coast of japan. it's 26 feet long. we're going to have more on this discovery on the broadcast tomorrow night. life may be getting a whole lot better for these chimps. we'll tell you why in a minute. we're all having such a great year in the gulf we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. t
to education to medical services. and, also, it's great fun and entertainmented. you see people very creative and especially young people. i always enjoy reading their comments and things like that. >> that is fantastic. you're a self-made entrepreneur. so impressive. several television shows, a growing media empire, hence the oprah comparison. >> it's a compliment. i have a lot of admiration for her for what she has done to empower women. i have a lot of admiration. >> so tell us about your show in china. who is your audience? >> i have two major shows. "one-on-one" is a more indent interview show with movers and shakers around the world. it's been on air 13 years and i've interviewed more than 600 leaders around the world including many u.s. presidents and secretary of states. another show, "her village" is more like oprah's show plus "the view" because i have two other younger women who are providing different perspectives onto certain issues that women care for. and we have celebrities, as well. as gras routes women telling their stories. >> are there professional opportunities? are they
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)